Adagrad depends on the choice of co-ordinate system

Adagrad is a learning regime that maintains separate learning rates for each individual model parameter. It is used, for instance, in GloVe (perhaps incorrectly), in LightFM, and in many other places besides. Below is an example showing that Adagrad models evolve in a manner that depends upon the choice of co-ordinate system (i.e. orthonormal basis) for the parameter space. This dependency is no problem when the parameter space consists of many one-dimensional, conceptually unrelated features lined up beside one another, because such parameter spaces have only one natural orientation of the co-ordinate axes. It is a problem, however, for the use of Adagrad in models like GloVe and LightFM. In these cases the parameter space consists of many feature vectors (of dimension, say, 100) concatenated together. A learning regime should not depend upon the arbitrary choice of orthonormal basis in this 100-dimensional feature space.

For feature spaces like these, I would propose instead maintaining a separate learning rate for each feature vector (for example, in the case of GloVe, there would be one learning rate per word vector per layer). The learning rate of a feature vector would dampen the initial learning rate by the accumulation of the squared norms of the previous gradient updates of the feature vector. The evolution of Adagrad would then be independent of the choice of basis in the feature space (as distinct from the entire parameter space). In the case of GloVe this means that a simultaneous rotation of all the word vectors in both layers during training does not alter the resulting model. This proposal would have the further advantage of greatly reducing the number of learning rates that have to be stored in memory. I don’t know if this proposal would have regret minimisation properties analogous to Adagrad. I haven’t read the original paper of Duchi et al. (2011), and what I am proposing might be subsumed there by the full-rank case (thanks to Alexey Rodriguez for pointing this out). Perhaps a block diagonal matrix could be used instead of a diagonal one.

Update: Minh + Kavukcuoglu seem to have adopted the same point of view in Learning word embeddings efficiently with noise-contrastive estimation (2013). Thanks to Matthias Leimeister for this.

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